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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the situation in sudan. after that, timothy diner takes place in a discussion on u.s.- india trade relations. then a conversation with the texas governor rick perry. >> this fourth of july weekend on american history tv on c-span 3 will visit the smithsonian to learn about day expedition to circumnavigate the globe and the treasure that they found, 40 specimens which became the foundation for the smithsonian. laura bush on her time in the white house planning her part -- husband's library. and her memoir. then a panel including mike mccurry discussing jfk's relationship with the press. it the complete schedule as c- span.org. >> he says he is optimistic that sudan is on track to become an independent state in july 9. the obama ministration warned sudan that it continue to block humanitarian aid from landing, it could risk relations with the u.s. this briefing is just under 20 minutes. we touched upon various issues which focused on the economic and financial partnership opportunities between our two countries. while many industrial speakers, government speakers, regulators, institutions air
know, newspapers sometimes describe pakistanis as quote-unquote paranoid and india-centric. no. we have a region where we will live long after the americans' security concern du jour has passed. we know that from fact. we know it from the cold war. we were the country that provided the intelligence base from which france's gary powers took off for his mission over the soviet union and got shot down. only to have the soviet union threaten us with retaliation because he took off from a base in pakistan without there being any american commitment actually to be there to protect us against that retaliation if that occurred. those are pieces of history. americans are a great nation, and i've said this. you know that this is my little cliche, but i'm going to repeat it anyway because sometimes cliches are good. and that is that americans do a lot of things very well. america is a great nation which has contributed immensely to human progress, the idea of liberty, freedom, the idea of democracy, modern capitalism, globalization, everything. and then, of course, more than any other nation in th
this in india. i worked with the president in india. farmers are using cell phones to text message their sprinklers to turn on and off. and they are becoming a heck of a lot more productive. if they can do it to be more productive and the sectors of the economy that you do not think as facebook users. they are harnessing the power of technology to improve their lives for their own work. i can't crack this code to get mainstream jobs harnessing this. restaurants are finding ways to optimize that extra seat, by harnessing the daily deal, the real file information -- real time information sharing. they are starting to see this in main street but we need to do more. >> i want to read-focus on the question asked. it's one of the key things we have tried to explore, which is how can we share the benefits of growth extensively? how can we have extensive g rowth? what we have is not just the stagnation of wages. we have a winner take all of society as the people that are able to compete on around the world in an information society have prospered in this country and others have not . i do
michele bachmann was on the night before and said that president obama's trip to india was going to cost $2 billion. what ever it was. and he had let it go. he did a wonderful thing, anderson cooper. he'd be constructed the whole -- deconstructed the whole story, showed how it began with an unnamed indian official. as if an unnamed indian official in maharajas and would have any idea what the president's trip was going to cost and involved 32 naval ships. this thing was crazy. so he did constructed the whole story. i thought it was so good, i got a transcript and i wrote a column on it, giving him a shout out for doing it. the next day i was giving a talk to the honor society. i get my bagel, my coffee, i sit down at the table lets 7:00 a.m. -- at 7:00 a.m. the first thing a young man said at the table is, did you know obama's trip was going to cost a billion dollars? and i said, did not see anderson cooper? i tell this whole story in the book. and michele bachmann just announced for the presidency. that is utterly irresponsible. >> let me talk about the role of new media. in that case,
much. when you tax them too ch, they go other places and when they go other places like china, india, mexico, vietnam, they take our jobs with them. i've heard a lot about medicare. the only party in this house who has cut medicare is the democrat party. $500 billion out of medicare in an ipab bill that is going to ration care for our seniors. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair would remind members to heed the gavel. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van holn: mr. speaker, i would urge my colleagues to look at the congressional budget office analysis of the impact of the republican budget on senior citizens on medicare. essentially what they do is give seniors a raw deal compared to what members of congress get themselves. anda raw deal in a big way. -- a raw deal in a big way. with that i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: yield one minute to dr. fleming. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana. mr. fleming: thank you. mr. speaker, but for the president of the united states
in this country. but i think there is opposition as well. i had a chance a few months ago to go to the india point nuclear power plant in new york with a lot of public interest. outside the gate of the plant were ten people who were protesting and were their partially because i was visiting so you have a press conference and on my way down i got out of the car, and what are finding general is there are lots of people with legitimate questions about the safety of nuclear power and ultimately it is the job of the nrc to make sure we take the appropriate steps to ensure the safety of the public. in the seven years i have been at the nrc, what i found is people who are dedicated every day to doing that, making sure we protect their health and safety is what we do. our have been impressed to see it so many ways as a commissioner. >> i will ask you to stand by. a couple of last housekeeping matters to take care of. i would like to remind our audience of the upcoming speakers. congresswoman michele bachman, presidential candidate of minnesota will be out here and the break goes on. governor gary johnson,
prime minister stand up for british business. and gets around world as i have done to china and india and africa and to suggest that because there are issues you have to answer a home you should cancel a trip like that and the opposition should be better than that. >> the select committees -- in 2003, on a catalog of the global traction in the media of potential payments made by journalists to the police. the investigation has announced will we understand the advice the committee would ignore? >> i am sure judicially inquiry will do that. one of the issues it is looking at is the relationship between politicians in the me and the conduct. >> if the prime minister had the new information about mr. coulson given by the guardian would he have gone ahead with the appointment? he should have passed that information. >> the point is this. if i have been told proper evidence that mr. coulson knew about hacking i would not have hired him. i couldn't be clear about this. .. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the previous -- or the prime minister's predecessor the honorable member said that he wanted t
in the range of 6.5, some of them such as india and china getting higher marks, so we are facing a turnaround which is very uneven with country's leading the charge and not those that were historic leading the charge and others advanced economies that are lagging behind in a way given the status of development. in the midst of that, we have clearly the two categories different issues to address but if ware to provide service and guidance, advice and recommendations and if and when necessary and if asked support. those are on the one hand the issues of sovereign debt and concerns all advanced economies ranging from japan to the united states, but clearly with a focus as you write about it as we know with a focus on the year autozone and in particular a country such as greece. on the other hand, when we look at emerging markets we have in some corners the risk of overheating, and we obviously have the risk of inflation as well, and sometimes particularly in the low-income countries the risk of imported completion that results from a high prices of commodities and including commodities obviously
serious to them and to us. as you know, they persist in the idea that the india poses an exsister-in-law threat to their existence while terrorists that operate in the fattah are less threat to them and therefore they allocate their resources accordingly and they embrace different engagement activities with us differently. we have been over the course of time working to convince them that the terrorist threat, the extremist threat and to their west is as great a threat and probably a greater threat to them than any threat that india might pose. but it's on that basis, it's on that select chal disagreement about what is most threatening to them that these programs are viewed. so we would tend to view programs to improve counterinsurgency capability and their general purpose forces, policing and security role for their frontier core. we would tend to view those as more important than the higher end processes and programs. it's just one of those things we have to continue to work through. >> thank you. there's been a great deal of discussion about standards of interrogation and detai
jobs were sent overseas to india and china, but in fact 1/3 of those jobs actually went to canada where they have one of the most aggressive tax credits in the world. so i think our brothers up north have maybe something that we can learn from here. it's not the only decision made in terms of where to hire, but they have done a very effective job of neutralizing and invest in their local market. >> well, mr. chairman since we are a domestic company, i'll only talk about the u.s. and i'll site two examples in my remarks when i talked about accelerating investment ps and creating jobs. when you look across the health care space, we have a problem with our health care system. that have spent annually on unnecessary medical costs as a result of poor costs and adherence of prescription drugs. we believe we can accelerate the sale of those drugs by bringing products and services that are a sluelings to hose problems and at the same time lower the overall and ip think many of you know we operate the largest number of in-store retail clinics. we have plans to double the number of clinics over t
are cost effective versus india. our manufacture anything kentucky can outpeat mexico -- outcompete mexico and china. mississippi and pennsylvania are the most cost competitive in the world. our work force is well trained, and we've invested substantial resources in manufacturing technology. i would ask even of you to review your outsourcing. that is jobs that have left the u.s. truly for cost reasons. u.s. you productivity and cost position has improve inside the past decade, and i'm convinced some of these jobs can return. at the same time, we must reunite the entrepreneurial leadership that's always exist inside the u.s. small business is lagging, as are ipos, and there are many opportunities to improve. lastly, leaders have to speak with confidence and not fear. people want to be led, businesses need stability and confidence to invest. but right now we are now offering stability or confidence. ge's a legacy u.s. company. we've been around a long time, as tom said. we've weathered the toughest recessions. but through multiple cycles in the last decade since 2000 we've earned more than $
. in the a 5%. the united states to%. -- india 5%. we need a national infrastructure bank. could have broad bipartisan support. it could help close the gap we need to restore roads, bridges, water systems, energy, telecommunications. allow us to build the 21st century and the structure. create jobs. jobs cannot be outsourced. help develop technology for the future. it is on the cutting edge of the technology once again. good jobs, well paying jobs, jobs one more time. we are a nation that consumes today. let us introduce legislation. american families are struggling today. we do not have the luxury for political games. that will create the jobs and rebuild america. >> thank you very much. the progressive caucus has been up until now on a five city tour. we have invited the local communities to come and talk to us about jobs and about what they see the american dream being. these are heart wrenching, very serious, anguished discussions. they involve the unemployed, the underemployed, and people looking for work who cannot find it. i would suggest to my republican colleagues that they need to
on in asia. host: is that china? guest: china. india, japan. that's where we should be looking. host: next caller is bernie from new jersey. good morning. caller: good morning. your two guests are excellent. gives me a good perspective on everything. what scares me is there are no plans and no goals. the no goal part scares me as someone that has grown up with this space program at age 59. i think it is bad planning by this administration. i understand the professor saying we have to set our goals to what we are doing next. if we look at the government like your heart. we have arteries going out and veins coming in. if you are out sourcing, you are getting new technology in all the time. there's a lot that has made our life better through the space program. not just the goal of going to mars or whatever. thank you. very interesting discussion you are having. host: thank you. here is a question on facebook from paul. since the columbia accident, nasa has always had a second shuttle on the pad to perform a second rescue if needed, is it not in place for this launch? guest: it is not in plac
in the country, who, incidentally, may be investing the benefits of those tax cuts in china or in india or job creation in many other places other than here. and the balance part of this amendment requires the passage of a balanced budget constitutional amendment that would require a supermajority to raise any new revenue or close any wasteful tax loopholes. so in other words, you don't have to have a supermajority to decide where and what you're going to wind up spending but you have to have a supermajority in order to raise any revenue or close an egregious tax loophole. one that may have no economic purpose, may be completely outdated, may be a sweetheart deal that got into the tax code over o the course of the years, but you still have to get a supermajority to get rid of that. everybody here knows how hard it is to get 60 votes. a lot of the business in the united states senate has been caught up by the eternal filibuster. every single nomination, every single small piece of legislation that comes to the floor of the senate, everything requires a motion to proceed which requires 60 votes,
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)